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Echo, the gray wolf, and why bambu supports her even after her death

The endangered gray wolf

bambu joined with 200 Business Leaders and 37 other Oregon companies by signing our name to the petition to protect the Gray Wolf. See info and post here. See the list of businesses that endorsed the letter to President Obama, and the Secretary of the Interior. (see letter here)

The tragic killing of Echo, the first Northern Gray Wolf spotted in the Grand Canyon since the 1940's inspired us to continue to press for the protection of the gray wolf in North America. 

(The Washington Post reports the story of Echo, here. For more details on Echo, and what this means read the news release from the Center of Biodiversity.)

We recently issued a letter to The Oregonian in cooperation with the Endangered Species Coalition. Our letter is below,

To The Oregonian,

Economic progress and environmental protection must go hand in hand. Many Oregonians, including myself, have built businesses founded on the idea that we do best when we balance growth with sustainability. This value is one that both State and Federal regulators need to more forcefully embrace as they make major decisions about wolves and the future of the west.

Oregon’s eastern gray wolf population has been slowly making a comeback, but both state and federal legislation threatens that progress. While Oregon state officials decide whether their recovery is strong enough to be removed from the state Endangered Species Act, members of Congress debate permanently delisting wolves across the nation.  Such an action would abandon the idea that we can prosper and preserve our natural treasures at the same time. This is why it is critical for all Oregonians to stand up and show they support protection of this keystone species. 

The gray wolf’s journey is inspiring.  It was not that long ago that wolves were brought back from the brink of extinction.  Only recently have wolves made such huge strides toward recovery.  As a nation, we have invested heavily in their recovery, which is why it is so important to safeguard that progress from the possibility of de-stabilizing a fragile population. And when it comes to wolf management decisions, I wholeheartedly believe it should be based on the best available science, not politics.  

The recent tragedy surrounding the shooting death of Echo, the first Northern Gray Wolf spotted in the Grand Canyon since the 1940’s, demonstrates that public education, law enforcement and solid science are needed now more than ever to help recover endangered wolves.

Wolf recovery milestones should be celebrated, but it does not mean that the work is over.  To achieve full, sustainable recovery for the wolf, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife must continue to use science-based management to track the wolf’s progress.  Delisting too soon can cause more damage to the species and reverse years of progress.    

As a local business owner, I believe it’s important to build our economy on a platform of conservation values.  Here in Oregon, it is possible to do it all: protect wildlife and those places we cherish, and grow our economy responsibly.  The long-term health of businesses and industries relies on a well-protected environment. Outdoor recreation provides approximately $646 billion in annual revenues for the United States and employs 6.1 million people directly. That’s a powerful argument for conserving wildlife habitat and protecting species that face endangerment.    

For those of us who appreciate them, wolves are a symbol of wild places. We owe it to our children and grandchildren to set an example of responsible stewardship for our precious wildlife by protecting the wolf in America and here in Oregon.  

  Jeffrey Delkin                                                                                                                                      

While at bambu, we make safe products from natural, renewable materials, our mission isn't about protecting animals.  But, our core values insist on the safe, and respectful stewardship of our planet and the species with whom we share it. That is why we are involved. It is also why we support Seafood Watch, and Honey Bee Lab. Sound research, and education to govern our decisions and look after our planet wisely.  Thank you for your support.


 

 

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